Chewsday Review- Soy Life Vanilla Creme Yoghurt

Lots of requests for a Chewsday Review featuring a dairy free yoghurt for all those kiddies allergic to cow’s milk. Soy Life seems to be the most popular brand, so here it is!

🔶Ingredients:
🔹Water, sugar, soy protein, maltodextrin, thickeners (1422, 1442), dextrose, inulin, canola oil, stabilisers (440, 412), mineral salt, flavour, food acids, natural colour, live yoghurt cultures.
🔹Inulin is a carbohydrate that has a slightly sweet flavour, and acts as a type of fibre.
🔹The thickeners are used to give volume and mouth feel that normally come from fat (as this is a low fat product).
🔹Common allergens include: soy
🔶The positives:
🔹Fat and saturated fat content meets healthy guidelines.
🔹The sodium content also meets healthy guidelines, which I would expect for a sweet product.
🔹The sugar content (10g/100g) meets guidelines (less than 15g/100g) but is higher than some other yoghurts.
🔹This is a good source of calcium. One tub provides 50% of a toddler’s calcium requirements and 36% of an older child’s requirements. This is SIGNIFICANTLY MORE than any of the coconut dairy free yoghurts (which have almost no calcium).
🔶The negatives:
🔹The first two listed ingredients (ie/ those present in the greatest amount in the yoghurt) are water and sugar. This bothers me, because you’re paying a lot of money for these yoghurts and the majority of the product is made up of cheap fillers. The rest of the ingredients are a combination of ingredients to replicate the texture and taste of yoghurt. Unfortunately for those intolerant to dairy, yoghurt isn’t easily made from soy. Hence the long ingredient list.
🔹This product is 99% fat free but if you’re feeding it to kids under 2 years of age, then a higher fat content is recommended. It’s recommended for older kiddies to have reduced fat dairy/alternatives.
🔹At $1.80 per tub, they’re not too different from the price of other yoghurt sachets (but they’re rarely on sale either!)
🔶The marketing:
🔹“Made from non-GM soy” Genetically modified ingredients are those that have had their DNA structure altered to create a new characteristic (e.g. an improved nutritional content). This has potential benefits (especially on a world scale), but many people don’t want to eat genetically modified foods. That’s totally up to you. In Australia, GM soy is not approved for growing, so companies must produce standard soy protein. However, imported soy can come from GM origins, so labelling is important to distinguish the type of soy used.
🔹“99% fat free” This is true, because soy is not a big source of fat.
🔹’No preservatives or artificial colours’. True, but there is an artificial flavour in there, if that’s something that bothers you.
🔹”Good source of calcium”. This term means that one serve provides at least 25% of the Recommended Dietary Intake. As you saw above, this is correct.
🔶The alternatives:
🔹If your child has to avoid cow’s milk, then this is probably one of your better food options for calcium. It’s a much better option than the coconut yoghurts.
🔹Soy milk (with a calcium content of at least 120mg per 100g) is another good calcium option.
🔹Other foods such as sardines, broccoli and almonds contain calcium, but you often have to eat a lot to get the amount of calcium the body needs. You can check out a ‘dairy free’ blog post I wrote for Annabel Karmel here where I discuss the different calcium containing foods compared to fortified soy products.
About Mealtime Building Blocks
Dr Kyla Smith is a paediatric dietitian specialising in fussy eating, feeding difficulties and childhood nutrition. Lauren Pike is an occupational therapist working in fussy eating and feeding difficulties. They have a private practice called Mealtime Building Blocks in Perth, Western Australia. You can connect with Kyla and Lauren on their website and sign up for their newsletter, and the Facebook page or on the Instagram page.
You can also email them.

I'm a paediatric dietitian working primarily with kids who find mealtimes difficult, or are considered 'fussy eaters'. I've spent 10 years working on a government funded Mealtime Management Team and I've just branched out on my own. I love the specialty area of mealtime difficulties. My blog is based on key questions that parents ask about childhood nutrition, feeding kids and managing fussy or picky eating.


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