Could there be a cure for coeliac disease?

Affecting an estimated 1 in 70 Australians, coeliac disease is a serious disorder characterised by gastrointestinal complications, nutrient deficiencies and mouth ulcers as a result of unnecessary immune activation in response to gluten. There is currently no cure for coeliac disease, leaving gluten-free diets the only form of disease management.[1]Coeliac Australia [Internet]. New South Wales: Coeliac Australia; c2018. Coeliac Disease [cited 2018 Apr 25]; [about 3 screens]. Available from: https://www.coeliac.org.au/coeliac-disease/ However, unprecedented developments into immunisation therapy for coeliac disease are underway that could potentially change the lives of coeliac patients. Conducted by a team of researchers at ImmusanT, Massachusetts, the vaccine known as ‘Nexvax2’ could offer a genuine cure for the disease and be available for mainstream use in under a decade.  What is coeliac disease? Coeliac disease is essentially an inflammatory disorder of the small intestine.[1]Coeliac Australia [Internet]. New South Wales: Coeliac Australia; c2018. Coeliac Disease [cited 2018 Apr 25]; [about 3 screens]. Available from: https://www.coeliac.org.au/coeliac-disease/ When people with coeliac disease consume gluten, various proteins within the gluten compound trigger an abnormal response of the immune system. This response involves the activation of immune cells called ‘T-cells’, which secrete pro-inflammatory molecules in the presence of gluten and contribute to …

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