Is personalised nutrition the future for dietary guidelines?

For many years, dietary guidelines in Australia have been no more specific than recommending a daily number of servings of various food groups based on a person’s age. Think 5 serves of vegetables and 2 serves of fruit per day. But there is now a new and exciting approach to healthy eating guidelines on the horizon, where nutrient requirements and limits for an individual can be determined based on DNA profiling. Behold: the world of nutritional genomics or personalised nutrition.  What is nutritional genomics or personalised nutrition? To put it simply, nutritional genomics is the study of the relationship between diet and gene expression.[1]Dennett C. The future of Nutrigenomics. Today’s Dietician [Internet]. 2017 Oct [cited 2017 Nov 22];19(10):31-4. Available from: http://www.todaysdietitian.com/newarchives/1017p30.shtml[2]Fenech M, El-Sohemy A, Cahill L, Ferguson LR, French TC, Tai ES et al. Nutrigenetics and Nutrigenomics: Viewpoints on the Current Status and Applications in Nutrition Research and Practice. J Nutrigenet Nutrige [Internet]. 2011 Jul [cited 2017 Nov 22];4(2):69-89. Available from: https://www.karger.com/Article/FullText/327772 It can be viewed as an umbrella term that covers two areas of diet and gene research:  Nutrigenetics explores how genetic variations can influence how the body responds to a given nutrient.[1]Dennett C. The future of Nutrigenomics. Today’s Dietician [Internet]. 2017 Oct [cited 2017 Nov 22];19(10):31-4. Available …

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