Tips on infant weaning – what’s after breastfeeding?

Weaning an infant from exclusively breast milk or infant formula to solid foods can be equally difficult for parents as for baby. While it’s easy to imagine the mix of sensations and emotions a baby might experience as solid foods are introduced to their diet, the process can also be a challenge for mums and dads. Many parents struggle with knowing when to start weaning, what foods to introduce first, and whether they should continue breastfeeding their baby while weaning. A survey in the UK found that many parents transitioned from using homemade ingredients when they started weaning to mostly using commercial pre-prepared infant foods after 3 weeks. Alarmingly, many parents were not concerned about the nutrient quality of these commercial foods.[1]A qualitative study of mothers perceptions of weaning and the use of commercial infant food in the United Kingdom. https://www.omicsonline.org/open-access/a-qualitative-study-of-mothers-perceptions-of-weaning-and-the-use-ofcommercial-infant-food-in-the-united-kingdom-mpn-1000103.php?aid=64679   Whether a baby has been breast or bottle fed, the process of introducing solid foods to their diet is the same. Preferably, weaning is a slow, gradual process that allows an infant time to adjust. It is recommended that infants are exclusively breast (or formula) fed until 17 weeks, with weaning ideally starting at six months. From six months, babies require additional nutrients that can’t be supplied …

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