Articles by Eve Reed

Eve Reed is the director of FamilyFoodWorks and is an Accredited Practising Dietitian with over 30 years experience working with children and parents and other health professionals, with an extensive background in child and adolescent nutrition, early childhood care, childbirth education and breastfeeding and counselling. She specialises in paediatric nutrition with a special interest in feeding behaviours, weight management and assessment of children’s/adolescent’s diets. Eve was a senior member of the Department of Nutrition and Dietetics at the Children’s Hospital at Westmead for over 13 years, and in that time co-authored three books on children’s nutrition and health: Kids, Food, Health 1,2 & 3. Most recently, she released the ebook, "Do you have a Fussy Eater?: A Step by Step Parent's Manual for Peaceful Mealtimes". Eve is a mother and grandmother and is passionate about family nutrition and helping parents enjoy feeding their children.


Self control vs trust and autonomy

It’s interesting that some health professionals think that there is possibly something wrong with the child that leads to obesity. Rather than looking at what is interfering with the child’s natural ability to regulate intake according to hunger and appetite, some parents and professionals look for deficits in the child. Self-control, generally defined as the…

Self control vs trust and autonomy

It’s interesting that some health professionals think that there is possibly something wrong with the child that leads to obesity. Rather than looking at what is interfering with the child’s natural ability to regulate intake according to hunger and appetite, some parents and professionals look for deficits in the child. Self-control, generally defined as the…

Self control vs trust and autonomy

It’s interesting that some health professionals think that there is possibly something wrong with the child that leads to obesity. Rather than looking at what is interfering with the child’s natural ability to regulate intake according to hunger and appetite, some parents and professionals look for deficits in the child. Self-control, generally defined as the…

Self control vs trust and autonomy

It’s interesting that some health professionals think that there is possibly something wrong with the child that leads to obesity. Rather than looking at what is interfering with the child’s natural ability to regulate intake according to hunger and appetite, some parents and professionals look for deficits in the child. Self-control, generally defined as the…

Self control vs trust and autonomy

It’s interesting that some health professionals think that there is possibly something wrong with the child that leads to obesity. Rather than looking at what is interfering with the child’s natural ability to regulate intake according to hunger and appetite, some parents and professionals look for deficits in the child. Self-control, generally defined as the…

Self control vs trust and autonomy

It’s interesting that some health professionals think that there is possibly something wrong with the child that leads to obesity. Rather than looking at what is interfering with the child’s natural ability to regulate intake according to hunger and appetite, some parents and professionals look for deficits in the child. Self-control, generally defined as the…

Self control vs trust and autonomy

It’s interesting that some health professionals think that there is possibly something wrong with the child that leads to obesity. Rather than looking at what is interfering with the child’s natural ability to regulate intake according to hunger and appetite, some parents and professionals look for deficits in the child. Self-control, generally defined as the…

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